Attention CAZymologists: Registration for CBM11 - The 11th Carbohydrate Bioengineering Meeting (Helsinki, 10-13 May 2015) - is now open!
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Also: Applications are now being accepted to attend the 2015 GRC on Cellulosomes, Cellulases & Other Carbohydrate Modifying Enzymes.

User:Anthony Clarke

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Anthony Clarke obtained his BSc in Biochemistry from the University of Waterloo, Canada in 1978, then completed his PhD at Waterloo with Thammaiah Viswanatha in 1983, working of the mechanism and inhibition of β-lactamases. His postdoctoral fellowship was carried out at the Carlsberg Laboratorium, Copenhagen, Denmark, working with Birte Svensson on structure and function studies of glucoamylase (GH15). He moved back to Canada in 1984 to work as a Research Associate at the National Research Council, Ottawa, with Makoto Yaguchi on mechanistic studies of Schizophyllum commune cellulase (GH5). In 1986, he joined the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Guelph, as an Assistant Professor, and then moved to the Department of Microbiology in 1987. In the following years, he served in a number of administrative positions at the University of Guelph, first as Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology for six years, followed by Acting Dean of the College of Biological Science, Assistant Vice-President (Academic), and Associate Vice-President (Research and International Relations). He is currently the Assistant Vice-President (Academic) and Dean of Graduate Studies. Despite this administrative activity, he has maintained an active research program throughout his academic career investigating the structure and function relationship of plant and bacterial cell wall active enzymes. These include cellulases, xylanases, muramidases, and particularly the lytic transglycosylases.
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